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olathe

In Kansas, Olathe City Council was to consider a non-discrimination ordinance for LGBTQ people.

This was an opportunity to promote equality and diversity while providing protections against discrimination based on sexual orientation and gender identity. In this way, all Olathe residents would feel that they were living on an equal footing. That was the plan.

minneapolis

A few days ago I was telling you about Edmonton, Canada, whose city council has approved a “conversion therapy” ban. Today, let’s talk about Minneapolis, Minnesota, where the city has agreed to protect LGBTQ youth.

kamala harris

Senator Kamala Harris entered in the 2020 presidential campaign in January.

Like her political career, which propelled her from Attorney General to Senator of California, her campaign quickly placed her among the best Democratic candidates.

And I must admit that she was my favorite because she has long been a strong supporter of the LGBTQ community.

A few days ago, Kamala Harris made the most difficult decision of her life. She withdrew from the campaign, giving up her dream of becoming the first woman and the first black woman to be elected President of the United States in 2020.

colonial williamsburg lgbtq history

Many LGBTQ people contributed to the Colonial Williamsburg in Virginia in the 1700s. Today, a guide that highlights their contribution has been created. They thus regained their rightful place in history.

katie hill

Katie Hill, 32-year-old, became the first ever openly bisexual person to be elected to the U.S. Congress in the mid-term elections of 2018. It was a real pride for this young politician and for our community.

san francisco trans awareness month

This is Transgender Awareness Month. We are both divided between the joy of celebrating the transgender community and the sadness at the too many murders that have taken place this year again.

Thursday, 28 November 2019 15:28

Poll: Are Americans Ready For A Gay President?

pete buttigieg

Is the United States ready for a gay president? That’s what a new survey tried to find out.

lgbtq families

We can now see the first signs of aggravation of discriminating laws against the LGBTQ community, and more particularly against families.

danica roem

In 2017, Danica Roem became the first transgender woman to serve in a legislature, the Virginia one, and guess what? She’s running for office again!

Monique Mousseau Felipa De Leon

After several years of love and living together, two lesbians from the Oglala Sioux Tribe in South Dakota wanted to evolve their relationship by marrying on the Pine Ridge Reserve.

In 2015, the U.S. Supreme Court allowed marriage equality across the United States, but Native American tribes do not depend on it for marriage. They have their own rules, and unfortunately, most of them have not yet approved same-sex marriage.

Since Native American traditions require couples to marry on sacred lands, many LGBTQ Native Americans cannot wed within their tribe.

In the Pine Ridge Reserve, Monique “Muffie” Mousseau and Felipa De Leon found it impossible for them to marry.

Both women felt very sad that they couldn’t marry within their tribe. Nevertheless, they received a marriage license in Pennington County and married in Mount Rushmore, considered sacred land.

The story might have ended there, but Muffie and Felipa are among those women who fight for generations to come. 

They set themselves the goal of legalizing marriage equality within their tribe. 

“We are looking out for future generations, for protections, and for equality,” Mousseau told the Rapid City Journal. “These foundations of laws have to be in place because we have grandkids. And that next generation coming up, we don’t want them experiencing the same (LGBTQ) bashing, we don’t want them to get to a point where somebody says a bad word to them because they like somebody of the same-sex and they hang themselves. We don’t want that.”

The result is hardly believable! By a 12-3 vote, the tribal council adopted a resolution amending the marriage Act and allowing same-sex people to marry.

Two days later, the same council recommended that the tribe pass a hate crime ordinance to provide protection based on sexual orientation and gender identity, inspired by the Matthew Shepard Act.

As a result, the Oglala Sioux Tribe became South Dakota’s first tribe to legalize marriage equality. Muffie and Felipa hope other tribes will follow their lead in allowing LGBTQ couples to marry.

“These are historic days for our tribe and for the rights of all people who seek equality, justice, and recognition under the law,” said Julian Bear Runner, president of the Oglala Sioux Tribe, through his Chase Iron Eyes.

 

The Oglala Sioux Tribe has legalized marriage equality!

The Oglala Sioux Tribe became South Dakota’s first tribe to legalize same-sex marriage.

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